Greg Abbott Knows He’ll Lose His Border Fight in Court: Former Prosecutor
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Greg Abbott Knows He’ll Lose His Border Fight in Court: Former Prosecutor


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Police drama is unfolding in Texas, with the state’s Governor Greg Abbott and the Biden administration facing off over a proposed floating buoy border along the Rio Grande. The Department of Justice issued an ultimatum for the removal of the buoys last week, but Abbott has vowed to take his fight to the Supreme Court.

Veteran prosecutor Joyce Vance has argued that Abbott’s vow of defiance is nothing more than a “pathetic” political stunt, given that his plans go against The Rivers and Harbors Appropriation Act of 1899, which unambiguously prohibits the “creation of any obstruction” in waterways without authorization by Congress and approval by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Vance has argued that Abbott knows his plans are doomed to failure in court. She’s accused him of playing politics at the expense of vulnerable people in attempts to score political points.

Abbott first announced his controversial plan to deploy the 1,000-foot inflatable border in Eagle Pass, Texas, last month. At the time, he said the state had to respond to the “crisis caused by the [Biden] administration”.

That raised humanitarian concerns, prompting the federal government to intervene. In addition to the floating barrier, Abbott’s plans for the border security also includes the installation of razor wire structures near Eagle Pass.

President Joe Biden’s administration responded by filing a lawsuit against Abbott. However, it’s unlikely that this saga will have a quick resolution, and the situation is likely to remain in a stalemate until its eventual resolution in court.

The issue will inextricably link political motivations with the plight of vulnerable immigrants crossing the border, and the court case is sure to be contentious. Regardless of the outcome, it’s clear that the underlying issue of immigration isn’t going away any time soon

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